title

The following films consist of my camerawork & directing, or a combination of my camerawork and edit producing, spanning the last five years.

Documentaries

Working the Sea

‘Working the Sea’ follows the fortunes of the Bagwells, a Sidmouth fishing family from the forties when young Stan was fishing with his father in a borrowed boat, to the nineties when they have two fish shops, two trawlers fishing out of Brixham, and three boats working off the beach at Sidmouth. Then, tragedy strikes and the women of the family pick up the pieces. The film also weaves the contemporary users of the coast, from the sailing club to the lifeboat, into the narrative. So this is ultimately a film about community spirit and how a mutual love of and respect for the sea draws people together. ‘This stunning film: fascinating and inspiring, funny and humbling is a powerful reminder how lucky we are on the coast’. Louise Cole Director Sidmouth Coastal Community Hub CIC

sidmouthcoastalcommunityhub.org
butterflyeffectfilms.com

Director of Photography Simon Vacher, Narrator Tara Griefenberg, Editor Simon Vacher, Written, Directed & Produced by Jo Stewart-Smith

A Butterfly Effects Film for Sidmouth Coastal Community Hub CIC

A Tale of Two Halves – Julie’s Story

Julie Stapleton went through the grief of loosing her husband Mark Stapleton in 2011, but through the sport of paragliding and her close network of friends and colleagues discovered that grief can be overcome by joy in this story of inspiration and enlightenment. Dedicated to Mark Stapleton. Produced and directed by Simon Vacher.

Corporate Documentaries & Communications

Who do you trust?

Scott Mills and Charlie Powell, meteorologist and presenter at the Met Office, explore the accuracy of weather folklore. Over three quarters of us use folklore to predict the weather. Find out which of the top five most-believed pieces of weatherlore are based on science and which are just myths. See more www.metoffice.gov.uk/weatherlore

Constructed Wetlands in the North Devon Biosphere

Part of the North Devon Biopshere’s Estuary Project, this film explains how creating new wetlands help to trap soil and nutrients and save farmers money.

Meet the supplier – Aldi British Lamb

In this week’s episode of the Taste Kitchen we visit Aldi supplier, Windsor Farm, to see how our 100% British Red Tractor assured meat goes from farm to fork.

Documentary Series

Boat Stories

Boat Stories: Lundy Island

Living and Working on Lundy Island – a look at the life of the warden, Beccy MacDonald, on the small island of Lundy off the North Devon coast.

Beautiful views and wildlife including grey seals and puffins.

A short film in the Boat Stories series.

Filmed and edited by Simon Vacher
Music by Rosamund Harpur
Directed and produced by Jo Stewart-Smith

This short film is part of the North Devon Moving Image (NDMI) Boat Stories series of short films about boats and fishing in North Devon. You can find out more about the project on the Boat Stories website http://www.boatstories.co.uk/

To see more short films from NDMI visit http://www.northdevonmovingimage.org.uk/

Boat Stories: Fishing for Clovelly herring

Fishing for Clovelly Herring follows traditional herring fisherman, Stephen Perham, as he rows out into Bideford Bay before dawn to shoot his nets. He explains his personal crusade to try and revive the local, sustainable herring fishery and get more people eating Clovelly herring.

Filmed & edited by Simon Vacher
Sound assistant Oscar Adams
Music performed by Rakes Adrift with thanks to The Waterboys for use of Fisherman’s Blues
Directed & produced by Jo Stewart-Smith
With thanks to
Northern Devon FLAG, Bideford Bridge Trust, Tarka Trust, Clovelly Estate.

This short film is part of the North Devon Moving Image (NDMI) Boat Stories series of short films about boats and fishing in North Devon. You can find out more about the project on the Boat Stories website http://www.boatstories.co.uk/

To see more short films from NDMI visit http://www.northdevonmovingimage.org.uk/

Boat Stories: Salmon Netting on the Taw and Torridge

Once upon a time almost everyone living by the Taw or Torridge in North Devon had access to a boat and tried to catch salmon. Licenses were introduced in the 1800s but for various reasons salmon numbers continued to dwindle. In 2002 the riparian owners (the rods men) offered to buy out the remaining nets men on the estuary for £10,000 each. Only three boats refused the money and continued to fish. Watch this story, told by 84 year old Stephen Taylor and his wife Sheila, documenting a traditional method of fishing which may soon disappear forever.

Filmed & edited by Simon Vacher. Music by Becki Driscoll & Nick Wyke (English Fiddle) Directed & produced by Jo Stewart-Smith.

This short film is part of the North Devon Moving Image (NDMI) Boat Stories series of short films about boats and fishing in North Devon. You can find out more about the project on the Boat Stories website http://www.boatstories.co.uk/

To see more short films from NDMI visit http://www.northdevonmovingimage.org.uk/

Boat Stories: Lobster Potting and Berried Hens – North Devon

A short documentary film looking at the life of lobster potter Geoff Huelin from Ilfracombe. This short film looks at the positive effects the no-take zone around Lundy island in North Devon has had on the lobster population and the fishing industry.

Interviews with Geoff Huelin and Sarah Clark from Devon and Severn IFCA.

Find out more about the Boat Stories series at www.boatstories.co.uk.

Filmed & edited by Simon Vacher. Music by Ben McCabe. Directed & produced by Jo Stewart-Smith.

This short film is part of the North Devon Moving Image (NDMI) Boat Stories series of short films about boats and fishing in North Devon. You can find out more about the project on the Boat Stories website http://www.boatstories.co.uk/

To see more short films from NDMI visit http://www.northdevonmovingimage.org.uk/

Documentary Series

Britain’s Treasure Islands

The three-part Britain’s Treasure Islands documentary series was broadcast on BBC FOUR on Tue 12 Apr 2016 21:00. (repeated Wed 13 Apr 2016 20:00). Contact info@simonvacherfilm.com to see a private non-downloadable preview of this programme online. Below are videos giving more information on the series, and over 90% of this series was filmed by Simon.

Overview of Britain’s Treasure Islands TV documentary series

The Britain’s Treasure Islands documentary series explores the wildlife, cultures, history and heritage of all of the UK Overseas Territories.

The Territories are a secret side of the UK that few know exist. Scattered across all seven seas, they comprise an area seven times the size of the UK and have twenty times the biodiversity, including over 1,000 unique species that are found nowhere else on earth. Join naturalist Stewart McPherson on a 70,000 km journey to the Caribbean, North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean, Pacific and Mediterranean, to discover the furthest flung outposts of Britain.

http://www.BritainsTreasureIslands.com

Please note: although complementary to the BBC FOUR series, the 40 short mini-documentaries are not commissioned or editorially overseen by BBC.

Filming the Britain’s Treasure Islands TV documentary series

This mini-documentary tells Stewart McPherson’s story planning and filming the Britain’s Treasure Islands TV documentary series. Stewart self funded the project, and over four years, managed to visit every one of the UK Overseas Territories to document a surprising side of the UK. He recounts his adventures traveling to the British Indian Ocean Territory, getting mugged by a striated caracara (the smartest bird of prey on the Falkland Islands) and filming in the icy waters of the British Antarctic Territory.

This film is one of forty mini-documentaries made from the footage not used in the broadcast series.

Visit http://www.BritainsTreasureIslands.com to view all 40 mini-documentaries free of charge.

Please note: although complementary to the BBC FOUR series, the 40 short mini-documentaries are not commissioned or editorially overseen by BBC.

To discovery the wildlife, history and cultures of all of the UK Overseas Territories, please visit www.BritainsTreasureIslands.com

Documentary Series

Britain’s Treasure Islands mini-documentaries

A series of short documentaries designed for on-line release exploring the wildlife, cultures and history of the UK Overseas Territories.

This film is one of forty mini-documentaries made from the footage not used in the broadcast series.

Visit http://www.BritainsTreasureIslands.com to view all 40 mini-documentaries free of charge.

Please note: although complementary to the BBC FOUR series, the 40 short mini-documentaries are not commissioned or editorially overseen by BBC.

To discovery the wildlife, history and cultures of all of the UK Overseas Territories, please visit www.BritainsTreasureIslands.com

Ascension Island – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife, heritage and history of Ascension Island, a UK Overseas Territory in the Atlantic. In this film, we see Ascenion’s extraordinary landscapes, vast sea turtle populations, bird colonies, land crab migrations and an incredible conservation success in the form of the return of the Ascension frigatebird.

Tristan da Cunha – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary showcases the wildlife, history and cultural heritage of Tristan da Cunha – the most remote inhabited island in the world. In this film we find out how the Tristanian live, by fishing the rich waters nearby the island that support vast seabird colonies, including penguins, and large populations of fur seals. On land, we find albatrosses and we follow the Tristanians’ Ratting Day activities in which the native wildlife is protected by controlling numbers of invasive rodents.

Falkland Islands – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife, history and cultures of the Falkland Islands. This UK Overseas Territory is a treasure trove of natural history, with commerson dolphin, enormous elephant seals, penguins and some of the largest albatross colonies on Earth. We follow Charles Darwin’s footsteps across the Falklands (for he spent twice as long here as he did in the Galapagos), we find striated caracaras – the most southerly bird of prey. These extraordinary raptors stole items from Charles Darwin and mugged presenter Stewart McPherson whilst filming! While many of the islands of the Falklands archipelago have been impacted by mankind, we visit an island with intact tussock vegetation which enables perhaps the greatest natural wonder of the Falklands; thousands of sooty shearwaters, which return back to their nests en-mass each evening.

South Georgia – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife of South Georgia, a UK Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic. It is a rugged, rocky isle, but home to some of the greatest wildlife spectacles on Earth. Colonies of over half a million king penguins congregate on its shores, along with millions of fur seals, elephant seals, albatrosses and petrels. The island harbours such concentrations of wildlife because, unlike Antarctic, South Georgia is not surrounded by ice during winter. An ambitious rodent eradication project has been undertaken, and it is hoped that South Georgia may harbour even greater numbers of animals in the future.

British Antarctic Territory – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife of the British Antarctic Territory – a wedge of Antarctica that includes the Antarctic Peninsula. This UK Overseas Territory is home to spectacular landscapes of ice; glaciers, ice bergs and ice sheets. This icy world is a home for leopard seals, many species of whales, penguins and petrels. On land, the flora of the white continent is sparse, and consists mainly of mosses, lichens and a few small flowering plants, but the few rocky outcrops of the Antarctic Peninsula were selected as sites for research bases of several nations. We visit Port Lockroy, a British base established during WWII. We find patriotic penguins trumpeting under the Union Flag, and the Royal Mail’s most southerly outlet. Nearby, we find beaches littered with giant whale bones – the legacy of a century of whaling. North of the Antarctic Peninsula, we visit volcanic Deception Island in the South Shetland Islands. This active volcano is covered with a mix of ash and now, and we find a strange mix of penguins and geothermal hot sands. But how will this unique icy wilderness survive in the warmer world of tomorrow?

British Indian Ocean Territory – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explore the wildlife of the British Indian Ocean Territory – seven huge coral atolls that include about 60 islands across a vast sector of the Indian Ocean. This UK Overseas Territory is home to unsurveyed waters, an unnamed island and the most pristine coral reefs on Earth. The underwater world of the British Indian Ocean Territory is like peering back through time to see a glimpse of the world before the impact of mankind. About one quarter of all of the reef fishes of the world live here. Unlike so many other parts of the globe, the reefs of the Territory are largely intact and represent the healthiest on earth. On land enormous colonies of sea birds abound; red footed boobies, brown boobies, sooty terns and many others. And in the forests that cover the island, there lives the coconut crab – the biggest terrestrial invertebrate alive today.

Pitcairn Islands – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife and heritage of the Pitcairn Islands – the only UK Overseas Territory in the Pacific Ocean. The Pitcairn Islands comprise four islands (Pitcairn, Henderson, Oeno and Ducie), although only Pitcairn is inhabited. Pitcairn is home to many unique animals and plants, as well as introduced animals, such as a giant Galapagos tortoise called Mrs. T and spectacular fig plants. Among Pitcairn’s unique plants is a unique abutilon, which is extremely rare, but being propagated in a conservation centre on the island. Offshore, the reefs are exceptional. The remoteness of Pitcairn has allowed exquisite coral gardens to survive. These are exceptionally rich and home to vast numbers of reef fish. On Henderson Island, large seabird colonies abound, including populations of four unique birds that occur now where else on Earth.

British Virgin Islands – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife, history and heritage of the British Virgin Islands, a UK Overseas Territory in the Caribbean. Famed as a premier tourist destination, the British Virgin Islands are a treasure trove for wildlife, a home for endangered iguanas, red-footed tortoises and flamingos. It was here where Christopher Columbus called in during his second journey to the New World. Following decades brought copper miners and sugar plantations. Hints at the presence of Amerindians can be seen across the islands in enormous mounds of queen conch shells. Even larger modern deposits of conch shells form giant islands offshore – millions of conchs strong. On land, vast sea bird colonies also abound, including magnificent frigate birds. But the frigates suffer from a deadly menace – fishing line – which causes a deadly trap that kills hundreds of birds each year. We follow local conservationists who free the birds from the deadly fishing line. On the main islands, wildlife has faced intense pressure as well, but much of the vegetation of the Territory is now regenerating, thanks to diverse conservation efforts and a network of well managed preserves.

Bermuda – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores Bermuda – the oldest of all of the UK Overseas Territories. Located in the North Atlantic, it is home to the oldest continually inhabited English settlement in the New World. It was first sighted by Spanish explorers, but settled by the English in 1609. Bermuda is home to many forts and the World Heritage site of St George’s, the old capital – home to history and traditions. In this film, we see the “dunking of the nagging wench” – a tradition dating back to the 18th century.Bermuda is the most urbanised of all of the UK Overseas Territories, however offshore islands are a haven for wildlife, including many unique plants and animals. On the remote offshore islands, a unique petrel was rediscovered after centuries of presumed extinction, and the species has been intensively conserved ever since. In this video, we follow this incredible conservation success story.

Cayman Islands – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife and conservation of the Cayman Islands, a UK Overseas Territory in the Caribbean comprising Grand Cayman, Little Cayman and Cayman Brac. All three islands are home to a staggering diversity of wildlife that occurs in tropical dry forests, mangrove forests and vast seabird colonies. In this film, we encounter fiddler crabs, snakes, land hermit crabs, exquisite orchids and many unique birds that occur no where else on Earth. The Cayman Islands are also home to two unique iguanas, both of which are critically rare. Grand Cayman’s blue iguana is so called for its striking blue colouration. The blue iguana was predicted to become extinct, but conservationists acted just in time by setting up a very successful breeding programme, and the species has been saved for the future. Off shore, diverse coral reefs are renowned across the world, and are the site for immense grouper spawning aggregations – including the largest remaining aggregation events left in the Caribbean.

Montserrat – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the history and wildlife of Montserrat, a UK Overseas Territory in the Caribbean. A series of volcanic eruptions began in 1995 and destroyed the capital Plymouth, which today is a modern-day pompeii. Tragically Pymouth today is a ghost town and two thirds of Montserrat lies in an exclusion zone. But the northern third of the island is home to approximately 5,000 Montserratians, and an incredible diversity of wildlife, including 10 species of bats, red-footed tortoises and a unique bird called the Montserrat Oriole. The island’s tropical forests are recovering, as are diverse reefs offshore. Sadly, one of Montserrat’s amphibians, a giant frog called the Mountain Chicken, was devastated, not just by the volcano, but by the introduction of deadly chytrid fungus. We follow pioneering conservation efforts undertaken by representatives of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust.

Anguilla – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores Anguilla, a UK Overseas Territory in the Caribbean. Anguilla is a flat limestone island surrounded by several smaller islands and cays. The land supports a diverse scrub of frangipanis, airplants and cacti, and the beaches provide habitat for nesting sea turtles. Across the island, several salt ponds are a haven for birdlife and offshore islands harbour some of the most important seabird breeding colonies in the entire Caribbean. But perhaps Anguilla’s most surprising secret is its many large cave systems that harbour dozens of ancient Amerindian carvings.

Turks and Caicos Islands – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife, history and cultural heritage of the Turks and Caicos Islands, a UK Overseas Territory in the Caribbean. The Turks and Caicos Islands are famed for some of the most beautiful coral reefs on Earth, home to sting rays, eagle rays, hundreds of species of reef fishes and humpback whales. Great numbers of sea turtles visit the beaches of the Turks and Caicos Islands to lay their eggs, however have been threatened in recent years due to unsustainable fishing. We follow the story of a successful conservation project to safeguard the turtles and an innovative farm to save another of the Territory’s rare animals, the Queen conch. Across the Turks and Caicos Islands, we find historic ruins from many centuries, including old plantations from slave-powered cotton farms, and vast salinas where salt crystals were once farmed. But the now abandoned salinas offer a refuge for countless migratory birds and flamingos today.

Akrotiri and Dhekelia – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife and history of the Sovereign Base Areas – two British enclaves called Akrotiri and Dhekelia on the island of Cyprus that make up a UK Overseas Territory. The wildlife of this Territory is diverse, and includes chameleons, flamingos, pine trees and nesting sea turtles. But it is not just wildlife that is preserved in the Sovereign Base Areas: both enclaves are home to dozens of ancient sites, including amphitheaters, temples, mosaics, settlement ruins and graves.

Gibraltar – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the history and wildlife of Gibraltar. The Rock is the smallest of all of the UK Overseas Territories, but is home to a staggering heritage dating back to Moorish ruins, Victorian fortifications and WW2 tunnels. In this documentary, we explore Gibraltar’s history, venturing into a secret WW2 chamber, built for a crack “stay behind” team to observe enemy movements in the event that the Rock fell to hostile forces. Although Gibraltar is just 7 km2, it is home to hundreds of plant species, including at least one that occurs no where else on Earth. Conservation projects are working to safeguard Gibraltar’s concentrated populations of raptors and vultures, and other efforts work to monitor diverse bat colonies. But the most iconic and famous of all wildlife on the Rock is undoubtedly the Barbary Macaques – Europe’s only population of wild primate. We observe the macaques, and in large discover, discover the Rock’s importance to another primate: Neanderthals, and Gibraltar has a surprising and globally important connection to these extinct hominids.

Ascension Island – natives and aliens

This mini-documentary explores the extreme fragility of the ecosystem of Ascension Island, a UK Overseas Territory in the Atlantic. We find a unique species of shrimp that occur in tiny brackish pools and occur no where else on Earth. On other parts of the island, unique ferns and other plants are endemic to tiny niche habitats. Such localised species are very vulnerable to change. Major impact arrived in the form of an extraordinary experiment undertaken by Joseph Hooker and Charles Darwin that aimed to create an artificial rainforest to capture water from the oceanic winds. Today complete unnatural man-made forests dominate the slopes of the tallest peak and have altered the ecological landscape of the island with major impacts on the native ferns and land crabs.

Ascension Island – supplying the garrison

This mini-documentary follows the story of Ascension Island, a UK Overseas Territory in the Atlantic Ocean. Ascension is a small, desolate volcanic island, yet it proved essential in the 19th century as an important victualing station for ships rounding the capes. The British garrisoned the island, built large forts and relied on the strongholds with vital supplies that could make or break round the world voyages. After Charles Darwin and Joseph Hooker visited the island, the two naturalists developed a radical idea – to create a man-made rainforest on Ascension’s tallest cinder to create drinking water for the garrisoned soldiers. The experiment was a spectacular success, and by the 1870s, the dry volcanic desert had been transformed into a lush rainforest. We explore the legacy of the experiment, and the surprising use of planted Norfolk Island pines.

Saint Helena – wirebird conservation

Saint Helena is a remote UK Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic Ocean. Its isolation has meant that it is home to many plant and animal species that have evolved into unique species that occur no where else on Earth. The wirebird is one such example, and is the subject of very intensive conservation efforts that are working to secure a future for this amazing bird.

Saint Helena – plant conservation

This mini-documentary explores the diversity of plants on Saint Helena, a remote island in the South Atlantic which forms a UK Overseas Territory. Introduced grazers and non-native flax plants have severely altered the vegetation of the island, and many of the unique plant species of the island are down to the last few individuals. But conservationists are working tirelessly to safe Saint Helena’s critically endangered plants from the precipice of extinction. In this film, we follow their efforts and see the rebuilding of Saint Helena’s flora through specialist nursery and the Millennium Forest.

Life on Tristan da Cunha – the World’s Most Remote Inhabited Island

This mini-documentary follows Stewart McPherson’s journey to Tristan da Cunha, the most remote inhabited island in the world. We meet the Tristanians and an interview with ex-chief islander Harold Green reveals what life is like in Tristan’s only settlement, Edinburgh of the Seven Seas.

Tristan da Cunha – the Monster Mice of Gough Island

This mini-documentary follows a rare visit to Gough Island – an extremely remote isle in the middle of the South Atlantic. Gough is widely regarded as one of the most important temperate seabird nesting sites in the world, with tens of millions of birds depending upon the island for nesting. Gough is part of the Tristan da Cunha group, and is uninhabited except for a small weather station. But the island has a dark secret… humble house mice that were introduced in the 19th century found abundant food in the form of the nesting seabirds, and few predators. They have bred unchecked and evolved into 27cm long (including tail) monster mice that kill albatross chicks and other sea birds. The horrific deaths that the monster mice inflict, by their nipping and biting, must be agonizing. The monster mice are now seriously threatening many unique bird species… will conservationists eradicate the monster mice and restore balance to this globally important seabird island?

Falkland Islands – Jimmy the ex-whaler

This mini-documentary focuses of exploring the fascinating whaling history of the Southern Ocean. The Falkland Islands were an important stopping point for explorers and later, the whaling fleets that operated in the waters surrounding Antarctica. Jimmy Smith is one of the last Falkland Islanders who worked in the whaling stations and on the whaling ships, and in this film, he shares some of his stories and insights.

British Indian Ocean Territory – coconut crabs

The British Indian Ocean Territory is home to the largest terrestrial invertebrate alive today – the coconut crab – a relative of the land hermit crab that can have a 90 cm leg span and can climb coconut trees. In this film, we follow naturalist Stewart McPherson on a life-long mission to observe full-size coconut crabs in their natural habitat.

British Indian Ocean Territory – seabirds

This mini-documentary explores the astounding seabird colonies of the British Indian Ocean Territory. The tiny islands of the Chagos Archipelago are havens for nesting birds, and a precious resource in the vastness of the Indian Ocean. Stewart McPherson was given rare access to visit several islands of the Territory to document the astounding diversity of birds that call this remote corner of the Indian Ocean home. In this film, we follow conservation efforts that aim to clear the islands of invasive rodents and coconut palms to allow the natural bird numbers to recover.

British Indian Ocean Territory – underwater

This mini-documentary explores the marine life of the coral reefs of the British Indian Ocean Territory. These reefs lie within the largest fully protected marine reserve on Earth, and due to their remoteness, they are widely regarded as the most intact coral ecosystem on the planet. The lack of commercial fishing allows the survival of the greatest densities of fish in all of the Indian Ocean. And the natural diversity is staggering, over one quarter of all reef fishes worldwide occur in the British Indian Ocean Territory, as well as endemic fish and coral species that occur nowhere else.

Pitcairn Islands – Henderson Island’s wildlife

Henderson Island is located in the Pitcairn Island group. It lies near to the middle of the Pacific Ocean – the largest ocean on the planet. It is one of the most remote and inaccessible islands on Earth, and remains uninhabited. Due to its isolation it is little impacted by mankind and harbours several unique species of birds that occur nowhere else. Stewart McPherson made a rare visit to Henderson Island, and this film documents the wildlife that he encountered.

Life on Pitcairn Island – home of the descendants of the mutineers from HMS Bounty

Pitcairn Island was settled by the descendants of the mutineers who commandeered the HMS Bounty in 1789. Today, the community on Pitcairn consists of around 50 people who have fascinating history, culture and customs. In this film, we visit Pitcairn Island to meet the islanders and discover life on one of the world’s most remote inhabited islands.

Amphibians and Reptiles of the UK Overseas Territories

The UK Overseas Territories are 14 groups of islands scattered across all seven seas. The Territories are home to a dazzling array of amphibians and reptiles, including dozens of species that occur nowhere else on Earth. This diversity includes many species of iguanas, including the spectacular blue iguana of the Cayman Islands, tortoises, sea turtles, several boas (including a rainbow boa with iridescent scales) chameleons and one of the world’s largest frogs. This mini-documentary explores this astounding diversity of amphibian and reptile species.

Plants of the UK Overseas Territories

The UK Overseas Territories are 14 groups of islands scattered across all seven seas. The Territories are home to every major vegetation type on earth, from kelp forests to rainforests, deserts to tropical dry forest, cacti gardens to tundra and barren moss and lichen covered rocks of Antarctica. Dozens of extremely rare and endangered plant species occur on the Territories and nowhere else on earth. This mini-documentary explores this astounding diversity of plants, and some of the conservation efforts that are being undertaken to safeguard the plantlife of the Overseas Territories for the future.

Mammals of the UK Overseas Territories

The UK Overseas Territories are 14 groups of islands scattered across all seven seas, home to a staggering diversity of native mammal species. From the Barbary macaques of Gibraltar (Europe’s only population of wild primates), to dozens of species of bats, many dolphins, porpoises and whales, as well as vast rookeries of seals. This mini-documentary explores the diversity of mammals that call the UK Overseas Territories home.

Birds of the UK Overseas Territories

The UK Overseas Territories are 14 groups of islands scattered across all seven seas. The Territories are home to a dazzling array of birds, from the tropics, through temperate latitudes to sub-Antarctic islands and the white continent itself. From seabirds to landbirds, migratory species to localised endemics, the range of birdlife of the Territories encompasses some of the largest penguin and albatross colonies on Earth, as well as many species of frigatebirds, hummingbirds and parrots, and even flightless rails and crakes. This mini-documentary explores this surprising diversity of bird species that call the Territories home.

Marine Life of the UK Overseas Territories

The UK Overseas Territories are 14 groups of islands scattered across all seven seas. They range from tropical coral seas, across temperate latitudes, to the icy waters of the Southern Ocean. As many of the UK Overseas Territories occupy remote corners of the world’s oceans and seas, many have intact marine ecosystems with a wide diversity of marine wildlife. This mini-documentary explores the marine life of the UK’s overseas lands.

Conservation Lessons of the UK Overseas Territories

The 14 UK Overseas Territories have 20 times the biodiversity of the UK, including over 1,000 unique species that occur nowhere else on earth. As remote islands and peninsulas, the UK Overseas Territories harbour fragile ecosystems that have been severely impacted by human activities, introduced non-native species and countless other processes. Hundreds of species across the Territories are now at the bring of extinction, but the dedicated and determined efforts of conservationists on all of the UK Overseas Territories are working to safeguard the Territories’ wildlife for the world of tomorrow. This film follows a few of the conservation stories from across the Territories.

Islands of Evolution

The UK Overseas Territories include many of the most remote islands in the world. The extreme isolation of oceanic islands often radically alters the array of plant and animal species that arises, and those species that do succeed in colonising remote islands are often subject to powerful evolutionary forces. Through these factors, islands can be seen as powerful engines of evolution, on which unique species emerge in often strange and wonderful ways. This mini-documentary explores the evolutionary processes and some of the unique species that occur across UK Overseas Territories.

Saint Helena – wildlife and heritage

This mini-documentary explores the wildlife, culture and history of the remote island of Saint Helena, a UK Overseas Territory in the Atlantic. We discover Longwood House, where Napoleon Bonaparte was imprisoned for the last six years of his life after the Battle of Waterloo. And we find Saint Helena’s unique wirebird and follow its confirmation. Saint Helena is home to many unique plants and arguably the island’s greatest treasure; its unique arthropods (more than 400 of which occur on Saint Helena and no where else on Earth).

Terrestrial Invertebrates of the UK Overseas Territories

The UK Overseas Territories are 14 groups of islands scattered across all seven seas. The Territories are home to a spectacular array of terrestrial invertebrates, from the coconut crab, the largest land arthropod alive today, to more than four hundred endemic invertebrate species on the tiny island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic. Many of the invertebrates of the UK Overseas Territories face critical threats. Some, such as Saint Helena’s giant earwig (the biggest earwig known to have existed) are already extinct. Others, such as the unique spiky yellow woodlouse are close to the brink – but teams of dedicated conservationists are working to safe the unique invertebrates of the Territories to ensure that they survive into the world of tomorrow.

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